Monday, February 9, 2009

Reflections.

If you tie a person by his hands and feet to trucks that pull him apart, would he really break in the middle? I don't know how that works, but I would imagine he would break at the weakest point, which I assume is where his arms are attached to his shoulders. I might be wrong of course.

Anyone know?

6 comments:

statskupp said...

I think the bones in either your hands or feet would break and you'd slip out of the knot. But assuming your hands and feet were truly and utterly stuck, I'd go for the wrists as the most probable tearing-point. Even though shoulders are known to get dislocated fairly easily, that area feels pretty stuffed with muscle and tendon, but I suppose that varies somewhat between individuals.

StigmataHandjob said...

That's a good point. Plus, that's where the force should be the greatest, right? Closer to the actual trucks.

statskupp said...

Nah. The proximity to the trucks shouldn't make any difference at all really.

And you shouldn't need two trucks. You'd just need an extra vehicle and driver and extra fuel-expenses. Just tieing the feet of the victim to a heavily rooted tree or something would work as well.

If you wanted to make it a little more interesting you could tie the arms, legs, hands, feet, torso and neck individually with 20meter lenghts of thin metal wire, fasten it to the top of a tall structure and force the victim to jump.

Daniel said...

This is so much more interesting than my own idea about tying someone to a chair and hook their nuts to a car battery. I have also toyed with the idea of catapulting people with a bonefied old school catapult. The trajectory might be a tad hard to calculate, though I think I could still get pretty close to the AF-building if given some time to calculate.

StigmataHandjob said...

Yeah but I want him pulled in two directions. No particular reason, just thought it could be fun.

And also, I believe you just made me cream my pants with the thin metal wire.

StigmataHandjob said...

And Lord knows the AF-building really could benefit from it, Daniel.